Additional Options
15) REALTOR SAFETY

REALTOR SAFETY MODULE RE-PRINTED FROM GUNSITELINKS.COM - OK TO COPY AND DISTRIBUTE!

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS:


DID YOU KNOW? THE NAR - NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS - HAS A SAFETY PROGRAM?

GUESS WHAT? ITS NOT A FEATURED TOPIC, AND 

GUESS WHAT ELSE? THE PROGRAM HAS VERY LITTLE  BASIC DEFENSIVE CONTENT,  AND 

THE REASON IS: I DUNNO. THEY DON'T WANT REALTORS TO HURT ANYBODY?

THIS IS AN INTERESTING ESSAY WITH USEFUL STUDIES AND STATISTICS: NAR REALTOR SAFETY REPORT.        . 


KEY CONCEPT:
DISCLAIMER - NO AMOUNT OF TRAINING CAN STOP AN INSANE, VIOLENT ATTACKER.


Statement From 2015 President Chris Polychron on Beverly Carter Tragedy

“As both a REALTOR® and an Arkansan, I am saddened by this morning’s news of Beverly Carter’s untimely death. My heart goes out to her family, her friends, her co-workers, and everyone whose life Beverly touched in her 49 years with us.

Working in real estate involves risk and, unfortunately, that risk takes many forms. As an industry, we collectively work very hard to promote safety awareness among our members. We are fully committed to educating REALTORS® about potential threats and providing them with resources to protect themselves.

I urge all REALTORS® to honor Beverly Carter by keeping safe and looking out for each other.”

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MEMO TO MEMBERS OF THE NAR:

THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN THE 
REALTOR SAFETY TRAINING MODULE OF MY PERSONAL PROTECTION WEBSITE. FIVE OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS AND MYSELF HAVE BEEN REALTORS FOR MORE YEARS THAN WE CARE TO ADMIT, AND THEREFORE UNDERSTAND VERY WELL THE UNIQUE CHALLENGES REALTORS FACE - THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS TO HANDLE DYNAMIC CRITICAL INCIDENTS: ONLY A SMALL PERCENTAGE ACTUALLY REQUIRE THE USE OF POTENTIALLY LETHAL FORCE. THAT'S BECAUSE, RELATIVELY SPEAKING, INCIDENTS INVOLVING REALTORS DON'T HAVE A GREATER CHANCE OF OCCURRING THAN THE POPULATION IN GENERAL. THAT SAID, LET ME MAKE MY POSITION 100% CLEAR: I BELIEVE THAT FIREARMS ARE DEFINITELY NOT FOR EVERYONE, BUT THAT EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE A WAY TO PROTECT THEMSELVES...

MY NAME IS JIM TROCKMAN. I AM THE OWNER AND MANAGING BROKER OF TROCKMAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS, AND AM A MEMBER OF THE SOUTHWEST INDIANA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS...

KEY CONCEPT:
THERE IS NO FIREARMS TRAINING IN THIS PRESENTATION!


THE ORIENTATION OF THIS PRESENTATION DOES NOT INCLUDE THE USE OF FIREARMS. LEARNING TO USE FIREARMS FOR PERSONAL PROTECTION IS A LENGTHY, TIME-CONSUMING, AND EXPENSIVE PROPOSITION. THERE ARE SEVERAL GOOD PLACES TO RECEIVE THIS KIND OF TRAINING, INCLUDING FROM MYSELF - IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT FIREARMS TRAINING,  PLEASE READ THE INFORMATION ON THE HOMEPAGE OF MY PERSONAL PROTECTION TRAINING WEBSITE, GUNSITELINKS.COM... 

YOU ARE WELL AWARE THAT BEING A REALTOR HAS SPECIAL RISKS THAT MUST ALWAYS BE CONSIDERED WHEN WORKING OUTSIDE OF THE OFFICE OR HOME. THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS SAFETY PROGRAM IS SOMETIMES*  (SEE BELOW) A GREAT RESOURCE FOR COMMON SENSE IDEAS ABOUT HOW TO STAY SAFE - NOT ONLY ON THE JOB; BUT ANYWHERE, ANYPLACE, AND ANYTIME...HOWEVER, IT IS VOLUMINOUS AND DOES NOT INCLUDE BASIC DEFENSIVE STRATEGIES! FURTHER, WHO HAS THE TIME TO READ ALL THAT STUFF, AND THE ABILITY TO  SORT IT ALL OUT? NO WORRIES: I HAVE DONE IT FOR YOU...AND HAVE FILLED IN THE BLANKS WITH STRATEGIES AND TIPS ABOUT WHICH REAL ESTATE COLUMNISTS ARE UNAWARE...


KEY CONCEPTS:
1) FAILING TO PREPARE IS PREPARING TO FAIL.
2) TO PONDER* IS TO PERISH.
3) NEVER DO NOTHING - THIS ASSURES YOU WILL LOSE.
4) RESPOND TO AGGRESSIVENESS WITH STRONG VERBAL SKILLS**, AND
5) IF #4 DOES NOT WORK - RESPOND IMMEDIATELY WITH EXTREME VIOLENCE.
6) BE FAST NOT FAIR - NO REFEREE WILL CALL A FOUL...TO WIN IS TO LIVE!


*REGARDING REACTION TIMES:
DOUBT - DELIBERATION - DENIAL AND DELAY -  CAN COST YOUR LIFE!


**REGARDING STRONG VERBAL SKILLS:
IF YOUR THROAT IS NOT SORE AFTERWARDS - YOU DID IT WRONG!

Real Estate's 6 Most Dangerous Everyday Situations

If you work in real estate, you undoubtedly do the following tasks all of the time, but did you know that you could be putting yourself in danger? Here's how you can stay on guard and protect yourself.

As a real estate professional, you put yourself at risk every day — you just might not realize it.

Meeting new clients, showing properties, holding open houses, letting strangers get into your car, and even your marketing may be jeopardizing your personal safety.

Such everyday tasks seem harmless, but as some real estate professionals have learned the hard way, these situations can expose you to danger.

Real estate is considered by security experts as a high-risk profession, says Robert Siciliano, CEO of a realty safety advisory company in Boston, and author of The Safety Minute: Living on High Alert (Safety Zone Press, 2003).

“The root of the issue is that you have real estate agents with no formal security training who are then meeting with complete strangers at odd times of the day and in vacant homes,” Siciliano says. “Real estate professionals put themselves at risk at so many points. The industry opens itself up to predators.”

Below are tasks common to practically every real estate professional. Learn the risks associated with each and what precautions you can take to stay safe.

1. Entering foreclosed or vacant homes

The Risk:Foreclosures may attract unexpected house guests — such as squatters — or former home owners refusing to leave. The homes also may be damaged and poorly lit or attract wildlife since it’s abandoned, leading to more potential safety hazards.

Safety Tips:

  • Inspect the exterior. Walk around the perimeter before you enter the house and make sure the door hasn’t been kicked in and no windows are shattered, suggests Tracey Hawkins, owner of a security company in Kansas City, Mo. Call police if you suspect someone is in the property. 
  • Don’t confront a squatter. If a squatter is in the home, leave immediately, Siciliano says. Call law enforcement once you've left and allow police to deal with any trespassers.
  • Use the buddy system. Ask a coworker, spouse, friend, or family member to come with you when you show the home.
  • Let others know where you are. Before you leave, tell your coworkers, family, or friends where you are, whom you are with, and when you expect to return.
  • Visit during the day. Visiting homes at night makes it more dangerous, Siciliano says. Try to make appointments during daylight hours only.

2. Meeting with a new client for the first time

The Risk:Meeting with people you don't know can put your safety at risk. You don’t know whether this person could potentially be a criminal, stalker, thief, or worse.

Safety Tips:

  • Meet at the office first. Get them on your territory before you visit any property with them so you can learn more about them and collect personal information about them for your files.
  • Ask for identification. The public is used to having their identification checked, so don’t be reluctant to ask because you’re scared you’ll offend someone, Siciliano says. Tell clients it’s company policy that all clients' driver’s licenses are photocopied. “This will significantly reduce your risk because the bad guys don’t want to give you their I.D. or get their picture taken,” Siciliano says.
  • Have all clients fill out a customer identification form. You can find an example of this at REALTOR.org. Click on “Prospect Identification Form” under the Office Safety Forms heading. The form asks for car make and license number, contact information, and employer information, and also requests a photocopy of the driver’s license.
  • Introduce them to a coworker. When you meet them at the office, introduce them to at least one other person in your office. Criminals won’t like that others have seen them for identification purposes. 

3. Showing a property alone

The Risk:You’re touring vacant properties with strangers.

Safety Tips:

  • Use the buddy system. “There’s always strength in numbers,” Siciliano says. Whether you bring a coworker, spouse, or even your German shepherd, avoid going alone.
  • Don’t go into confined places. Avoid basements and attics — it’s too easy to become trapped. Instead, know the selling points of these rooms and remain in the foyer on the first floor with the front door open as the buyer tours these areas, Siciliano suggests. If you must join them in each room, always stay by the door, leaving doors open so you can flee more easily if necessary, the Washington Real Estate Safety Council suggests.
  • Walk behind. Let potential buyers take the lead when exploring a home, with you always following behind.
  • Let others know where you are. Tell them where you are going, when you will be back, and who you’re with. Better yet: Share this information while the client is with you so they know someone else knows where you are.
  • Have an excuse. If you feel uncomfortable, tell the person your “cell phone or beeper went off and I have to call the office” or “another agent with buyers is on his way,” suggests the Washington Real Estate Safety Council in their tip sheets. 

4. Open houses

The Risk:You’re inviting the public to a property, which is an invitation to anyone, from thieves to those who might want to harm you.

Safety Tips:

  • Promote security in your advertisements. When you advertise the open house, note that identification will be required at the front door and video surveillance will be in use. “The bad guys will be less likely to show up,” Siciliano says.
  • Partner up. When would-be assailants see two people at the front door, they’ll be less likely to go in. 
  • Introduce yourself to neighbors. Let them know you’ll be showing the house so others know that you are there.
  • Watch for patterns. At an open house, note any patterns in arrivals, particularly near the end of the open house. One common scam: Thieves come near the end of the open house, working as a team. They have “buyers” distract the agent as others steal valuables in the home. 
  • Stow away your valuables. Never leave your purse, laptop, or wallet unattended on the counter in plain view. Keep them in the trunk of your car. However, always keep your cell phone on you so you can call for help if you need to. Also, before the open house, tell your clients to put away all of their valuables, prescription drugs, and mail.

5. Flashy personal marketing

The Risk: Marketing materials that contain photos of yourself may attract the attention of criminals. Police have found criminals circling real estate professionals’ photos in newspapers and marketing materials.

Safety Tips:

  • Avoid provocative photos in your marketing. Low-cut blouses, full-body photos, and looking over your shoulder in a sexy pose can send the wrong message to criminals. “Why do you have to have photos anyway? What are you selling?” asks Hawkins, who advises against ever using a photo for business reasons; she uses a caricature. “You make a living meeting complete strangers in empty houses. They see your photo and if you’re exactly what they’re looking for — whether that be an older or younger agent, blonde hair, blue eyes, whatever — they know all it takes is one phone call to meet you in a house. A picture can be dangerous.”
  • Watch what you wear. Only wear shoes that you can run in. Avoid short skirts, low-cut tops, and expensive jewelry. “Predators don’t have the same boundaries as you do. They look at you like that and say ‘She’s asking for it,’” Siciliano says.
  • Protect your personal information. Use your cell phone number and office address in your marketing so it can’t be tracked back to your home address. Never use your home address or home phone number. Also, don’t reveal to your client personal information about your children, where you live, and who you live with — you can still build a relationship with clients without revealing all of your personal information, recommends the Washington Real Estate Safety Council.

6. Transporting strangers in your car

The Risk: You’re showing houses to potential buyers and chauffeuring them in your car from house to house. Most people don’t pick up hitchhikers, yet real estate professionals put strangers in their car all of the time and don’t think anything of it, Siciliano says. There’s a risk of being robbed, your car being stolen, and you victimized and thrown to the side of the road.

Safety Tips

  • Drive separately. Have the client follow you from listing to listing. If you absolutely have to take one car, then you should drive.
  • Watch where you park. Make sure your car won’t be blocked in and that you park in a place where you’ll be able to get out quickly. Park on the street or the curb, if possible, suggests the Washington Real Estate Safety Council. You’ll attract more attention if you run and scream when fleeing, and it’ll be easier to escape than having to back out of a driveway, experts say.

“Security is all about layers of protection. Open house signage, notation in ads, using the buddy system — everything that you do is an extra layer of security,” Siciliano says. “The more you do, the more secure you’ll be. Do nothing and the more vulnerable you’ll be...

KEY CONCEPT:
NON-LETHAL OPTIONS...


THE POLICE HAVE LETHAL AS WELL AS NON-LETHAL OPTIONS, SO DO YOU!

STRIKING B
ATONS - PEPPER SPRAYS - STUN 'GUNS' - STUN FLASHLIGHTS - AND TASERS. TASERS DIFFER FROM STUN 'GUNS' IN THAT TASERS FIRE A PROJECTILE TO DELIVER A SHOCK, WHEREAS STUN 'GUNS' MUST COME INTO CONTACT WITH THE THREAT...

THE MOST IMPORTANT NON-LETHAL ITEM YOU MUST CARRY IS A TACTICAL FLASHLIGHT (AND IT HAS A TON OF OTHER PRACTICAL USES WHEN INVESTIGATING BASEMENTS, CRAWLSPACES, WHEREVER EXTRA LIGHT IS NEEDED. YOUR CELL PHONE FLASHLIGHT REALLY DOESN'T GET IT ANYWAY, DOES IT?) A 'Mag' light won't do...a tactical flashlight must have at least 120 lumens, be an LED, work on 3 volt batteries, have a strobe feature, a lanyard, and an end cap switch. DO NOT compromise any of these features. If you are paying attention, get in touch with me by email or text and I will get back to you with some additional flashlight info! Check Optics Planet, MidwayUSA, Brownells, or Battery Junction for the best prices.

ARE YOU STILL PAYING ATTENTION? THERE IS ANOTHER LETHAL OPTION: THE KNIFE IS A VERY, VERY SERIOUS ALTERNATIVE TO A GUN, AND DOES NOT TAKE LONG TO LEARN THE BASICS. WANT MORE INFO: NOT FOR THE FEINT OF HEART, BUT IF YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW WHY THE KNIFE IS A GOOD PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL STOP, JUST CONTACT ME ANYTIME...SO LET'S MOVE ON:


KEY CONCEPT:
THERE ARE TWO MAIN WAYS TO STOP THE BAD GUYS..
.

  • Forced Teaming. This is when a person implies that he has something in common with his chosen victim, acting as if they have a shared predicament when that isn't really true. Speaking in "we" terms is a mark of this, i.e. "We don't need to talk outside... Let's go in."
  • Charm and Niceness. This is being polite and friendly to a chosen victim in order to manipulate him or her by disarming their mistrust.
  • Too many details. If a person is lying they will add excessive details to make themselves sound more credible to their chosen victim.

  • Typecasting. An insult is used to get a chosen victim who would otherwise ignore one to engage in conversation to counteract the insult. For example: "Oh, I bet you're too stuck-up to talk to a guy like me." The tendency is for the chosen victim to want to prove the insult untrue.
  • Loan Sharking. Giving unsolicited help to the chosen victim and anticipating they'll feel obliged to extend some reciprocal openness in return.
  • The Unsolicited Promise. A promise to do (or not do) something when no such promise is asked for; this usually means that such a promise will be broken. For example: an unsolicited, "I promise I'll leave you alone after this," usually means the chosen victim will not be left alone. Similarly, an unsolicited "I promise I won't hurt you" usually means the person intends to hurt their chosen victim.
  • Discounting the Word "No". Refusing to accept rejection.

SUMMARY:

UNFORTUNATELY, THERE ARE TIMES WHEN COMMON SENSE, AWARENESS, AND GOOD JUDGEMENT ARE NOT ENOUGH TO OVERCOME REAL WORLD THREATS, SO...

1) REMEMBER THE INTELLECTUAL AND BEHAVIORAL CONCEPTS YOU HAVE JUST STUDIED...

2) CONSIDER ACQUIRING A SIMPLE TO USE NON-LETHAL TOOL, AND SPEND AN HOUR WITH A PROFESSIONAL TRAINER LEARNING LEARN HOW TO USE IT (MY PERSONAL FAVORITE, FORMERLY KNOWN AS A TASER C2, IS THE NEW TASER BOLT - I ALSO LIKE THE NEW TASER STRIKELIGHT )

3) IF SOMETHING DOES NOT SEEM RIGHT - ITS HIGHLY LIKELY THAT IT'S NOT...

4) NEVER LEAVE A SAFE PLACE, TO GO INTO A POTENTIALLY UNSAFE PLACE...

KEY CONCEPT: RESPECT THE 'TRUST YOUR GUT' FEELING - IT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE!

WHAT NEXT? YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY, ULTIMATELY, SO HOW YOU CHOOSE TO CONDUCT YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE MAY OR MAY NOT KEEP YOU SAFE! REMEMBER, YOU HAVE CHOICES: THERE ARE ONLY SO MANY POLICEMEN AND POLICEWOMEN ON DUTY AT A GIVEN TIME, AND SERIOUS CRIMES ARE CONSTANTLY BEING COMMITTED EVERYWHERE. UNFORTUNATELY, THIS PROVERBIAL MAXIM IS THE RULE: 'WHEN SECONDS COUNT, THE POLICE ARE ONLY MINUTES AWAY'. IN ACTUALITY, THE POLICE RARELY PREVENT CRIMES - THEY ONLY JUST SHOW UP IN TIME TO INVESTIGATE THEM...

KEY CONCEPT:
WHEN NOT USING LETHAL FORCE, THESE ARE YOUR BEST OPTIONS, IN THIS ORDER: 


AVOID, EVADE, ESCAPE, DE-ESCALATE, USE STRONG VERBAL SKILLS, CARRY NON-LETHAL OPTIONS, FIGHT TO LIVE (A FEW EXAMPLES ARE: BITE, SCRATCH, KICK, CHOKE, CUT OR STAB).

LOOKING FOR MORE  INFORMATION? SEE KEY CONCEPT BELOW...

KEY CONCEPT:
CONSIDER SIGNING UP FOR MY FIREARMS RELATED DEFENSIVE MINDSET MODULE.


...
IN THE FUTURE, IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN TRAINING THAT INCLUDES LEARNING TO USE A VARIETY OF OPTIONS, TO PROTECT YOURSELF OR OTHERS, PLEASE CONTACT ME FOR MORE INFORMATION. MY DEFENSIVE MINDSET MODULE IS A FIREARMS RELATED, ONE-OF-A-KIND CRASH COURSE THAT COVERS THE LETHAL ASPECTS OF SURVIVAL. ITS NOT, HOWEVER, FOR THE FAINT-OF-HEART... INITIAL CONTACT BY EMAIL ONLY, PLEASE!

BEST REGARDS, JIM


Trockman Realty and Investments

812.454.9888   (cell)
812.867.9888   (office)










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